Teaching Kendal to Sew

My granddaughter Kendal asked me to teach her to sew. She used my scissors to cut polar fleece and she used my serger to hem the edge. Polar fleece doesn’t fray so it doesn’t need a hem, but it was good practice for her. She is 4 in these pictures. I had her sit on my lap and guide the fabric through the machine as I ran the foot pedal and made sure we didn’t sew any little fingers. She had a lot of fun!

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Half-square Triangles

One of my favorite quilt tops is a windmill pattern using two fabric colorways. One day soon I plan to make a queen-sized quilt using white and blue. Until then, here is a tutorial on how to make Half-square Triangles and a 5″ windmill block.

Cut two 3 1/2" squares in each of two colorways.

Cut two 3 1/2″ squares in each of two colorways.

Select two coordinating fabrics and cut two 3 1/2″ squares from each. Lay them right sides together and use a ruler to mark a diagonal line. IMG_9709Sew 1/4″ on either side of the diagonal line. Cut on the diagonal line.

Trim to 3" block.

Trim to 3″ block.

Finger press the seam toward the darker color. Press with a steam iron being careful not to distort the bias edges of the block. Sew two blocks together lining up the diagonal seams with a pin.

Windmill block

Windmill block

Sew the two-block units together pinning where the points meet. Open the seam on the back side of the fabric and press to make a 5″ windmill block. Trim to 5″ square before sewing it to another 5″ block in quilt construction.

Prairie Points

I’m going to show you how to make some pretty cool Prairie Points. Chose two coordinating fabrics and cut them each 3 1/2″ square.

Two pieces of fabric cut 3 1/2" square.

Two pieces of fabric cut 3 1/2″ square.

Lay one on top of the other with right sides facing. Sew 1/4″ seams all the way around. Use a ruler to draw a line and cut with scissors or use a rotary cutter to cut across the diagonal.

Cut on the diagonal.

Cut on the diagonal.

Turn the triangle right-side out being careful not to distort the bias edges of the triangle. Use something with a pointy edge to turn the point. Press.

Prairie Points

Prairie Points

You could make a bunch of Prairie Points to put around the edge of a baby quilt, or as a decorative edge on an apron pocket or bag.